QRStuff.com - QR Code Generator

How To Create A Free QR Code

Posted: July 23rd, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: General, Generating QR Codes, How To Create A Free QR Code, How To Create A Free QR Code | 2 Comments »

Go to www.qrstuff.com to create your own fully functional and non-expiring free QR codes without needing to sign in or register.


Styling Your QR Code

Posted: March 29th, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: General, Generating QR Codes, QRStuff Features, Styling Your QR Code, Styling Your QR Code | 5 Comments »

Late last year we introduced adding a logo or image to your QR code and recently we’ve rolled out a complimentary QR code styling feature for modifying the look of your QR code – now you can ensure that your QR codes really stand out by branding them with your logo and your colours and giving their appearance a distinctive tweak.

Independently set the colours and shapes for the data modules and the corner eyes and, optionally, embed a logo or image as well all from one interface with a range of options that give you the flexibility to change the look of your QR code a bit or a lot – the choice is yours.

To access this feature, log into your paid subscriber account, enter the details for your QR code, and then look for the “Style Your QR Code” button. Free users can also access this feature but will not be able to save the styling that they apply to their QR codes.

All of the colour choice and shape options are available together with the facility to upload your logo or image, a transparent background selection option, and a real-time preview of the finished QR code – when you’re done, click “Done” and download your completed QR code image.

JPG, PNG and GIF logos and images up to 6Mb in size can be added to dynamic and static QR codes across all data types and, through your paid subscriber account dashboard, you can also style any pre-existing QR code regardless of how long ago it was created.

As with all QR codes that paid subscribers create with us, you can download the finished QR code as a high resolution raster image (PNG, JPG, TIF up to 600dpi) or vector image (EPS, SVG, PDF, and DXF), and all of the usual paid subscriber features – dynamic QR code editing and analytics, password protection, pausing, scheduled release, scan limit setting, sticker template creation – are also available with your styled QR codes.

And Don’t Forget To Test…

Always test your QR code to make sure it works the way you need it to. Unexpected technical issues, misspelt URL’s, problems with the website the QR code links to, poor QR code image colour choices, etc, etc, are always best checked before you go and print 100,000 copies of your brochure!

 


Add A Logo Or Image To Your QR Code

Posted: September 29th, 2016 | Author: | Filed under: Add A Logo Or Image To Your QR Code, Add A Logo Or Image To Your QR Code, General, Generating QR Codes | 6 Comments »

At QRStuff.com we’ve been meeting the world’s QR code requirements since 2008 and every year we’ve rolled out regular updates and enhancements to what we offer our users, and improvements and upgrades to how things work “under the hood”.

2015 was a big year for new front-end QR code features and QR code management tools. Our 2016 program saw the release of our PDF QR Codes a few months back and the upgrade program continues with the release of our latest new feature – adding a logo or image to your QR code.

QR Code Branding

How To Make One

To create your own personalised and branded QR code image, just log into your QRStuff.com account, create your QR code, upload your logo or image, and it will be automatically placed in the centre of your QR code at an optimal size and position that maintains the scan reliability of your QR code. Once you’ve downloaded and tested your QR code (TIP: you should always test your QR code) you’re good to go!

This feature is available to paid subscribers and supports the insertion of JPG, PNG and GIF files up to 6Mb in size. Images can be added to dynamic and static QR codes across all data types and, through your paid subscriber account dashboard, you can replace or remove a previously inserted logo or image, or add one to any pre-existing QR code regardless of how long ago it was created.

QR Code With Logo

As with all QR codes that paid subscribers create with us, you can download the finished QR code as a high resolution raster image (PNG, JPG, TIF up to 600dpi) or vector image (EPS, SVG, PDF, and DXF), and all of the usual paid subscriber features – dynamic QR code editing and analytics, password protection, pausing, scheduled release, scan limit setting, sticker template creation – are also available with your embedded logo QR codes.

Best Practice

Being one of the very few ISO-standards compliant QR code generation services, we take technical compliance and scan reliability seriously, so we’ve built in some automated features that address several technical issues that are often overlooked when customising the appearance of a QR code. We’ve been doing QR codes globally since 2008 and best practice is what we do.

  • The error-correction level is upgraded to Level H (30%) to maximise scan reliability.
  • The inserted image is automatically resized so that it doesn’t occupy more than 12% of the surface area of the QR code image.
  • The image is optimally positioned so that it doesn’t obscure any of the “protected” areas of the QR code. Obscuring these “protected” areas will cause the QR code to fail.
  • A buffer is added around the image so that scanning apps don’t misinterpret elements of the logo as being part of the data load of the QR code itself. The buffer size is algorithmically optimised for the version number of the QR code you’ve created.
  • After the image has been inserted, any resulting partially obscured or incomplete data modules are removed from the QR code image so that “broken” data isn’t introduced into the QR code.

Add A Logo To A QR Code

We also separately store the original uploaded logo image file so that if you subsequently resize the QR code image, or change its output file type or resolution, we can regenerate a fresh new insert image that matches the new QR code image specifications rather than just re-using the perhaps lower quality thumbnail image from last time.

And Don’t Forget To Test…

As we mentioned earlier, you should always test your QR code to make sure it works the way you need it to. Unexpected technical issues, misspelt URL’s, problems with the website the QR code links to, poor QR code image colour choices, etc, etc, are always best checked before you go and print 100,000 copies of your brochure!

 


Colour QR Codes

Posted: September 9th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Colour QR Codes, Colour QR Codes, General, Generating QR Codes | 1 Comment »

rainbow-qr-code2One of the more common reasons why a QR code won’t scan is because there isn’t enough contrast between the foreground and background colour used.

For a QR code to be scanned reliably the contrast difference between the foreground colour and the background colour used in the QR code image must be large enough for the camera in the scanning device to be able to identify the QR code pattern against its background.

If the contrast between the foreground and background colours isn’t large enough then the scanning device won’t able to “see” the QR code image against the background and hence won’t be able to scan it and decode it.

So, how much contrast is required? The answer is in two parts.

1. Tonal Contrast vs Hue Contrast

Many QR code scanning apps scan in black and white (grey-scale) and not in colour so the “contrast” value actually relates to the difference in the grey-scale tone (or brightness) of the two colours used and not the differences in their hues (colour).

To show the difference between Hue Contrast and Tonal Contrast here’s two QR code shown in colour and as their grey-scale equivalent – basically what we see versus what the scanning app “sees”.

colour-to-grey

While there’s an obvious difference in foreground and background colour used in each QR code, the grey-scale tonal contrast in both cases is pretty much zero. Because it scans in black and white the scanning app won’t “see” the colours, just the greys, and hence not being able to discern the QR code image, the scan attempt will fail.

2. How Much Tonal Contrast Is Enough?

The amount of tonal contrast to ensure a reliable scan is going to depend on several factors:

  • Ambient light – not even a black and white QR code will scan in the dark.
  • Surface reflection – a shiny QR code image will reflect white. Not good if it’s on a white background.
  • Scan distance – the further away the QR code is, the smaller it looks to the camera and hence the more pronounced the distinction between foreground and background areas needs to be. This distinction is enhanced by a higher foreground to background colour contrast.
  • Camera quality – some cameras have a better tonal range response than others.

With a few variables at play it’s probably best to set a conservative tonal contrast level that’s going to work in the majority of situations and we reckon that safe contrast level is 40% or greater – ie; in terms of their relative brightness one of the colours should be at least 40% darker than the other one.

So, if your background colour has a grey-scale equivalent of 20% grey and your foreground colour has a grey-scale equivalent of 75% grey, then the tonal contrast is 70% – 20% = 50% tonal contrast. As this tonal contrast is greater than our recommended minimum of 40%, there’ll be no contrast-related scanning issues with this QR code.

Obviously a traditional black and white QR code will have the maximum possible scan reliability since its tonal contrast is 100% (white is 0% grey and black is 100% grey). As tonal contrast decreases from this 100% maximum so will the QR code’s theoretical scan reliability, but selecting a foreground/background colour pair with a tonal contrast of greater than 40% (and ideally greater than 60%) will ensure that your QR code functions as expected under most conditions.

The image below shows the approximate grey-scale equivalent of various shades and hues across the colour spectrum. ie; the black-and-white version of every colour in a particular row is represented by the same shade of grey.

grey-colours

Tonal Contrast Calculator

Here’s a handy tool that will help you determine the tonal contrast between two colours so that you can choose a QR code foreground/background colour combination that can be used with confidence.

Reverse Image QR codes

While we’re talking about QR code foreground and background colours and scan reliability I thought I’d briefly touch on another issue – reverse image QR codes, where the foreground is a lighter colour than the background.

While a reverse image QR code is supported under the ISO standard, it’s quite surprising how many scanning apps can’t read a reverse image QR code. Unfortunately this a scanning app thing and not a QR code thing so if you are intending to publish a reverse image QR code it might be a good idea to do a test scan on it first.

Here’s the same QR code in normal and reverse image versions – see how your scanning app works with them.

reverse-image